Monthly Archives: April 2014

How to be Succesful Whith a Book Proposal

A few major steps you should follow when you sent out your book proposal to an agent or publisher

What is the book about?

Give a clear idea about the book in the very beginning if you want your proposal to be read.You need to present what is most catching about your book in a couple of sentences.

Who do you address?

Who is your target audience,what will you give them that is interesting and new.You can compare your book with others in the same genre and mention what are the new approaches of the subject, a few conclusions and how the story will influence the target readers.

Craft yourself a good biography

A biography should be included in your submission but do yourself a favor and don’t start telling them about cats and dogs and how much you love your family or how many children do you have.

Agents, publishers and media outlets want to hear about you as a writer, have you been published, where and when, do you won any awards, do you have a strong relationship with some radio or TV Shows,are you a contributor to some literary publications, magazines or newspapers?

What experience gave you credit to write about this particular subject and anything else you can think of which will recommend you as the right author for such a book, subject and genre.

What is your marketing plan?

This should be realistic and specific,You may know specialized publications that might be interested to put on an article or some radio shows which you’ve been in contact with in the past.

How do you see cross promotion in accordance with your subject and what are you going to do in terms of pre-pub promotion, before your book is out on the market (blog tour for cover reveal, free chapters uploaded on specialized sites, building or developing your author platform, website, blog, social media accounts).

Express your intention of setting – up a pre-order campaign and giveaway, and mention a few major reviewers where do you intend to send galleys or ARC .

Publicity after the release of your book

You still have to work hard after the book is released and this is exactly what you should do and what a publisher wants to hear.Tell them about asking for reviews, fan pages created, speaking engagement in your local libraries, launch parties if you are going to do such a thing.

You can organize a virtual tour in advance for the release day and tell them how many sign – ups do you have or if you have the intention to find a publicist to do all of this for you. If so say a few words about the publicist, a few authors who were promoted by him/her, mention a book which is succesful because this publicist efforts.

 

Twenty two advantages of blogging for inspiration

Digital Dimensions

ID-10061819
Image courtesy of Renjith krishnan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

This article points out twenty two advantages of blogging. If you go through this post you may find that many of these benefits are enjoyed by you while having a blog. I can assume that this post is going to encourage many bloggers especially new ones who are looking for some motivation. This blog may serve to inspire those who are undecided as to whether they should continue with their blogging for various reasons of their own.. I suggest it is a good idea for you to reblog this post so that you can have the list of things accessible for you at anytime you want. Reading this post may motivate you whenever you read it and may make you feel that you should not stop blogging but continue with renewed zest.So here is the list of twenty two advantages of blogging.

1. Networking with…

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Writing Transitions In Fiction

A.M. Harte

Without transitions, your story will not flow smoothly.

Transitions are words and phrases that serve as bridges from one idea to the next, one sentence to the next, or one paragraph to the next. Three minutes later… After five hours… The next day… These phrases keep the reader from having to find his or her own way and possibly getting lost in the reading.

Transitions are the glue that holds your ideas together. They are very important, but too many transitions can cause as much confusion as too few.

You don’t necessarily need a transition between every idea or every sentence, but it is a good idea to use a transition between each paragraph. Transitions usually come near the beginning of a paragraph, however you should use a transition wherever it works best.

The eHow article on How to Write Transitions In Fiction offers some useful advice.

How do you…

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AUTHORS – When was the last time you?

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Said THANK YOU to a reviewer and clicked the LIKE button under their review?

like-button2The means to do both is provided by Goodreads and Amazon!

Authors often complain about the lack of reviews for their Bestselling Stories, but how many of you interact with readers who DO leave their reviews?

Having received thank you’s and/or messages from authors about my short, simplistic and unprofessional (but honest) reviews myself, I know how nice it feels (and I deal with authors on a daily basis!).

It may encourage them to read at least one more of your books!

Likewise, when Amazon sends me an email to notify me that someone has advised that my review helped them, (they had clicked the LIKE button under it), it pleases me and it’s not always, or only, the author who does so.

fightAVOID making comments or taking up arms against unfavourable reviews – read

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Social Media, Book Signings & Why Neither Directly Impact Overall Sales

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Original image via Rosaura Ochoa via Flikr Creative Commons Original image via Rosaura Ochoa via Flikr Creative Commons

One of my AWESOME on-line pals posted something troublesome on my Facebook page. Apparently there is a recent article in a major writing magazine that declares social media does not sell books and, in a nutshell, isn’t worth the effort.I’ll warn you guys ahead of time that I went hunting for the article—at the last remaining Barnes & Noble within a 25 mile radius of my home—and couldn’t find said article (and have asked Kim to get me the specific issue). But, since this type of commentary is prevalent enough in the blogosphere, I feel I can address the overall thesis accurately enough.

Social Media Was NEVER About Selling Books Directly—Who KNEW?

Image via Flikr Creative Commons courtesy of Zoetnet. Image via Flikr Creative Commons courtesy of Zoetnet.

I’ve been saying this for about ten years, because the idea of using social circles for sales is NOT new…

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At Least Know Your Environment

Most authors have the core, the kernel of their idea. It may be the climax of the trilogy – The Federation regains control of the shipping lanes and can continue trading – or it may be  the central theme – Redhead women in New York are being attacked, and the assailant keeps their left sock – but whatever the premise of the story, the writer has a starting point. I doubt if any successful first novel came from someone thinking ‘I’m gonna write a financial crime thriller’. You need an idea, at least.

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Famous Writers on Writing

Liked and reblogged on Authors PR Literary Lounge

MaxEverhart

I recently read an article about the work routines of famous writers, and a common theme emerged: discipline and dedication are far more important than talent or skill. I cobbled together the best quotes from some of my favorite authors. Their insights helped me stay motivated.

Tobias Wolff

I know I have to push through. Sometimes when I get to the other end it still won’t be that great, but at least I will have finished it. For me, it’s more important to keep the discipline of finishing things than to to be assured at every moment that it’s worth doing.

Bernard Malamud

There are enormously talented people around but the problem is getting organized to use your talents. A lot of people lose it, they just lose it. Life starts turning somersaults over your back and the next thing you know you’re confronting things that seem to you more…

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Merrimack Media – Publishing and Marketing Agency

merrimack

Merrimack Media is  a company where the flow of quality books, websites, and graphics, are all delivered with exceptional customer service. Our one-stop shop gets your book into print, distributed to a world-wide audience and promoted. Merrimack Media exists to help you publish painlessly, offering you information, self-publishing, promotion and sales services at a reasonable price. At the end of this I want to introduce you to Jenny Hudson, founder of Merrimack Media – publishing and marketing agency.

Hello Jenny and thank you for agreeing to this interview. Please tell me when did you start Merrimack and from where you get this idea, what motivated you?What kind of services do you offer at Merrimack and what is that its make Merrimack Media special?

 There are lots of places that authors can go to self-publish, but we handle it all…book interior and cover design, ISBN,  publishing, world-wide distribution and help with promotion, including website and social media design and setup.  We interview our authors on the Author Connection radio show and give them some initial publicity as well.  We are a Lightning Source approved, preferred publisher.

 Writing and publishing a book is a dream of so many people. Some aspiring writers seek put agents or traditional publishers while others look for self publishing. What are the pros and cons of each?

It comes down to control, time and money.  In self-publishing the author has the final say and can make upwards of $10 a book if he sells it himself.  The time from completing a manuscript to being on Amazon is about 4 weeks. In traditional publishing, the publisher has the final say on editing and cover design, the author makes about 75 cents a book, and it can take about a year and a half.  Both methods require author marketing.

There are so many self publishing choices and new companies emerging the market continuously. What are the major aspects that a writer must consider when looking for a self-publisher?

 Experience, customer service, knowledge, and talent.  There are lots of companies out there who produce a book that looks “self-published”.

 Every writer wants the joy of seeing their books in print so there is a point where the publishing decision is driven by emotion, not seeing  the facts. What is your advice for the writers, what they should be aware of and what would you walk away from in a contract?

 Check the publisher commission.  We take 10% for administration from online book sales.  Other companies I know of take 15 and 20%.

 Please give me an example of Merrimack Media Contract where everybody win, The publisher and the writer (shares, profits, subsidiary rights, etc)

 The author retains all rights.  We take 10% of online sales and the author gets the rest after subtracting book printing costs and Amazon’s wholesale discount.

 The big  issue about a book is not just publishing but distribution as well. What Merrimack Media does about marketing and distribution.

 We distribute to Amazon, Barnes & Nobles, the Ingram List, Nook, Kindle, and Smashwords., which gets you on ipad.  We also handle fee-based author promotion.

 What is the most exciting thing for you in this profession? 

I love seeing authors’ lives change when they get their books and run with it, taking them in an entirely different direction.

 Tell us  about the wonderful people working for you and helping  you to achieve your goals.

We have great editors, book designers, and cover designers, a social media person, and a project manager.

 I was pleased to have Jenny Hudson here today explaining a few things about publishing business. If  you want to find out more visit her website where you will see Merrimack packages, resources and other useful information.

Thanks again Jenny Hudson and good luck with all your endeavors.

http://www.crowdpublishr.com/

http://merrimackmedia.com/

 

Common Publishing Terms and Abbreviations

Kate Brauning

Below is a list of common terms and abbreviations you might see as you read my posts or other publishing blogs. About a year ago I wrote a similar list, and it has turned out to be one of my most popular posts, so here it is, revised and updated!

  • Agent: Literary agents are professionals who represent an author’s career. The most well-known task an agent performs is selling the writer’s manuscript to a publishing house and negotiating the contract. Agents do much more than this, however, and function pretty much like career managers.
  • Beta reader: Usually beta readers are people that an author asks to read his/her manuscript and give critiques and respond to the story. This is not the same thing as a critique partner.
  • Big 5: Previously the “Big 6,” these are the major New York publishing houses: Hachette Book Group, HarperCollins Publishers, Macmillan Publishers, Penguin Random…

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A Synopsis Checklist

Writers In The Storm Blog

Years ago I was struggling to try and figure out how to write a synopsis. It took a lot of input from other writers, and some workshops, but I finally became comfortable with syopsis writing—and now it’s one of my favorite tools. I’m now doing my “Sexy Synopsis workshop again for Outreach International Romance Writers, but I wanted to offer up my synopsis checklist.

A synopsis is one of the most useful tools you can have. It keeps you from getting stuck. It starts you thinking about blurb and marketing copy. It can even show up flaws you might have in your plot, as in maybe the conflict really isn’t strong enough.

The checklist I developed came from looking at a bunch of synopses and from taking a lot of classes on synopsis writings. Feel free to take this list and customize for your own use. Your synopsis should…

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